Why did you choose Stanford? While I always found the initial resuscitation of patients with undifferentiated pathology in the ED rewarding, I enjoy the broader medical practice, deeper understanding of physiology, and more extended time with patients afforded by specialization in CCM. I really could not imagine any other type of program that has the same caliber mentorship and education as the one at Stanford and which also fosters such an incredible atmosphere for learning and growth. Fellows will be trained in team management and will oversee house staff from the Departments of Neurology, Neurosurgery and … The majority of clinical rotations occur at Stanford University Hospital; however, fellows also spend time at Santa Clara County Medical Center and Kaiser Permanente Redwood City Hospital. Why did you choose to train at Children’s National? Candidates who are exploring Stanford for fellowship are encouraged to attend the Diversity Reception and Socials that are hosted by the hospital’s GME Office. ARDS, and intracranial pathologies, Endocrine consequences of pituitary tumors, Ethical considerations for end-of-life decisions, Exhibit safe order writing and closed-loop communication, Moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (Subdural and epidural hematomas, hemorrhagic contusions), Administration and management of intravenous thrombolysis or intra-arterial therapies with Neurointerventional team, Management of patients pre and post CEA or stenting, Aortic arch cerebral and spinal embolism and spinal infarctions, Hereditary and acquired hypercoagulable states, including antiphospholipid antibody syndromes, Disseminated intravascular coagulation, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, other hematological disorders, Hypertensive encephalopathy/Posterior Reversible Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome, Cervical and intracranial artery dissection, Vasculopathies including genetic (i.e. It's very gratifying to focus directly on the kind of patient care that I anticipate providing throughout my career. She also won the prestigious Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award, which recognizes clinical excellence, outstanding compassion in the delivery of care, and respect for patients, families, and health care colleagues. Why did you choose Stanford? Why did you choose Stanford? Why did you choose Stanford? Neurocritical care as a recognized and distinct subspecialty of critical care has grown remarkably since its inception in the 1980s. The CVICU because it has a wide variety of cardiovascular pathologies, surgical procedures, and mechanical circulatory support devices, enhancing my understanding of physiology when stretched to its limits. As an ER doc, everyone looks so sick, and it's easy to get fatalistic. Outside the hospital, the Bay Area is a great place to live with the ocean, mountains, and wine country all within a few hours drive. Fellows serve in many different roles: triaging, seeing consults, running codes, leading rounds, etc. You'll work daily alongside an incredible team of staff members, APPs, senior residents, pharmacists, RTs, and nurses. **  Note: Amounts subject to change, https://med.stanford.edu/gme/diversity.html, Leadership Education in Advancing Diversity Program (LEAD), Stanford Diversity Programs for Residents and Fellows, Lewy Body Dementia Research Center of Excellence, Stanford Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, Telestroke and Acute Teleneurology Program, Improvement Capability Development Program, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford, Clinical Assistant Professor, Harbor UCLA Medical Center; Director of Inpatient Neurology; Associate Stroke Director, (Torrance, CA), Instructor, Stanford University School of Medicine (Stanford, CA), Neurointensivist, Mission Viejo Hospital (Mission Viejo, CA), Neurointensivist, Sound Critical Care (Tucson, AZ), Neurointensivist, Intermountain Medical Group (Salt Lake City, Utah), Neurointensivist, Mercy Medical Group (Sacramento, CA), Endovascular Neurologist, Banner Health (Phoenix, AZ), Neurointensivist, California Pacific Medical Center (San Francisco, CA), Understand how to treat acute neurological emergencies and manage all patients in the intensive care unit who are neurologically critically ill or have a neurological complication, Learn the principles of general critical care medicine, Gain proficiency in procedural skills related to critical care medicine, Learn to prioritize and triage competing care needs, Develop expertise in the diagnosis, management, and prevention of vascular neurological disorders, Learn from the diverse neurological disorders seen in various patient populations, Gain an understanding of the process of clinical research and the critical evaluation of the literature, Acquire skills to teach neurology to medical students, interns, neurology residents, and physicians of other disciplines, Develop a sense of purpose with regard to ethical and humanistic aspects of care, with an emphasis on compassion and respect for patient-centered values, Physiology of cerebral blood flow, metabolism and intracranial pressure, Pathophysiology and treatment of increased intracranial pressure, altered cerebral blood flow states and coma, Neurological examination techniques, including examination techniques for a comatose patient, Neurosurgical and neurology imaging techniques, Various neuro-monitoring techniques and their use in guiding hemodynamic therapy, Ventilator management for brain injured patients, Hemodynamic management for patients with brain or spinal cord injuries including fluid resuscitation and vasopressor therapy, Airway management with special focus on patients with reduced level of consciousness, cranial nerve impairment and patients with traumatic brain, facial and cervical spine injuries, Sedation regimens, scores, weaning and special considerations in neurocritical care patients, Special considerations of pain management in neurocritical care patients, Management of fluid, acid-base, and electrolyte disturbances, Management of nutrition including routes, indications and ability to create basic nutritional plan, Basic infection control risks, strategies to prevent and treat ventilator associated pneumonia, urinary tract infections, central venous line infections and surgical wound infections; demonstrate basic knowledge of antibiotic therapy, groups of antibiotics, neuro-specific considerations e.g. Our neurocritical specialists are all fellowship-trained in neurocritical care and provide advanced diagnostics, neuroimaging, … My favorite rotation is MICU - green, primarily because of the decision making challenges and level of acuity seen especially in our oncology patients, I enjoy working with and learning from the various consulting teams that are often involved in the care of these medically complex patients He completed medical school at the University of Iowa, with additional research training in serotonin and neuronal control of breathing at the Mayo Clinic and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, followed by internship in internal medicine at CPMC in San Francisco and then Stanford for Neurology Residency. As one of the leading neurocritical care research groups in the country, there are numerous ongoing clinical trials in neurocritical care and robust basic science and translational research programs. Why Critical Care Medicine? Stanford University School of Medicine Neurology Clinician Educator Search (2020 rolling ad) The Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine is seeking board-eligible or board-certified neurologists to join the Department as a Clinical Assistant Professor, Clinical Associate Professor, or Clinical Professor in the Clinician Educator line. Through fellowship and now as faculty, I continue to draw on the knowledge and training I acquired during fellowship and apply them consistently in current clinical practice and teaching. Stanford Neurocritical Care program currently has eight faculty neurointensivists: Karen Hirsch, MD, Division Chief, Neurocritical Care, Anna Finley Caulfield, MD, Neurocritical Care Fellowship Director, Chitra Venkatasubramanian, MBBS, MD, Clinical Professor, Prashanth Krishnamohan, MBBS, MD, Clinical Assistant Professor, Zachary Threlkeld, MD, Clinical Assistant Professor, Hannah Louise Kirsch, MD, Clinical Instructor. The clinical experience provides learning from the best in the field: we rotate as independent fellows under the MICU, SICU, and NeuroICU attendings. Specialty: Emergency Medicine. Why Critical Care Medicine? As an infectious disease trained physician, I wanted to train in Critical Care Medicine as these two specialties have strong potential for synergy in patient care, clinical and epidemiological research. Applicants invited to interview with the program will be notified via email by Program Coordinator Valerie Berland. I chose to train at Stanford for the opportunity to provide the most advanced care to the sickest patients in an environment alongside colleagues with backgrounds in emergency medicine, anesthesia and pulmonary/critical care medicine specialists. DR. ACHAL ACHROL is Director of Neurovascular Surgery and Neurocritical Care at the Pacific Neuroscience Institute and Chief of the Glioma Surgery Program at the John Wayne Cancer Institute at Providence Saint John's Health Center in Santa Monica (Los Angeles), CA. The multidisciplinary nature of the CCM program at Stanford allows you to benefit from the varying expertise of your colleagues who come from diverse training backgrounds. Excellent training with a great group of fellows, faculty, and staff. Anesthesiologists must step up as peri-operative experts that patients and surgeons can rely on for providing high quality care from start to finish. The diseases treated by a neurocritical care physician are broad, and include stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, traumatic brain injury, brain injury after cardiac arrest, seizures, spinal cord injury, neuromuscular disorders, and many others. The MICU and NCC attending both have been very supportive in teaching new procedures, or refining procedures I'm already comfortable with, or showing new approaches. Stanford have a strong tradition in research, commitment to mentorship, a strong presence in medical societies, and it offers tools for leadership, diversity, and medical education that are unique in the country. Previously, he was a neurosurgeon at Stanford University School of Medicine. Critical care medicine offers the opportunity to manage acute deteriorations in life threatening situations. I was very excited about how ultrasound oriented this fellowship is and since that is one of my passions, I was eager to be part of this. Having colleagues from these different fields has certainly helps active knowledge sharing, discussions and debates that broadens one's understanding of the science behind our daily clinical practice. I enjoy the interaction with multiple specialties, and patients and their families. Dates: 7/20 - 6/21 Stanford ICU sees a good mix of ischemic strokes, hemorrhages, subarachnoids, neurotraumas, neuromuscular pathologies and status epilepticus. I chose Stanford for the integrated nature of its program. Professor of Neurology and of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center Board Certification: American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, Neurology (2011) Board Certification, United Council for Neurologic Subspecialties, Neurocritical care re-certification (2018) Dates: 7/19 - 6/21 It is an extremely productive clinical rotation with a good patient volume. The program is a joint fellowship between UCIMC (UC Irvine Medical Center) and CHOC (Children's Hospital of Orange County), and both Adult and Pediatric positions are offered. Lecture topics by faculty reflect the below core curriculum. The learning opportunities are endless. Raymond Pashun (268) Neurocritical Care at Stanford is a great rotation. Cost of initial DEA license and renewals Outside of the fellowship, Stanford has an incredible medical humanities program; there are lots of opportunities for an aspiring writer like me to find friends and mentors in storytelling, journalism and writing. "I chose the Stanford Neurocritical Care Fellowship for its robust clinical volume, broad pathology exposure, and strong culture of community amongst residents, fellows, and faculty. Why did you choose Stanford? Examples include: ventilator management, sepsis, post-cardiac arrest care, intracerebral hemorrhage, EEG in the ICU, acute ischemic stroke endovascular trials, and transcranial doppler, among many others. I believe Stanford is a unique place where a Neurocritical Care fellow is trained at par with the fellows from other critical care medicine fields. The fellowship at Stanford has an awesome mix of specialities intereacting together. The faculty work closely to focus on neurocritical care training for the neurocritical care fellows, vascular neurology fellows, surgical and medical critical care fellows, and Stanford neurology and neurosurgery residents and medical students as well. Critical Care Medicine is the last frontier of medicine. Physician coats and laundry services What’s your favorite rotation, and why? Dates: 8/20 - 7/21 Accept Challenges. James Mitchell, MD (261) Susannah Empson (283) Most recently I really enjoyed the SICU rotation where I had the opportunity to manage very critical patients and perform a lot of procedures. Jason Leong (277) This fellowship provides a balance of clinical training in the intensive care units of St. Louis Children’s Hospital (SLCH) and exposure to … "I chose the Stanford Neurocritical Care Fellowship for its excellent clinical training, ample research opportunities (and flexibility to conduct research even during busy fellowship time), and the truly supportive environment to grow as a neuro-intensivist. Sachin Agarwal, MD, MPH – Attending Physician, CUIMC; Jan Claassen, MD , FNCS – Medical Director, CUIMC, Neurointensive Care Unit; Soojin Park, MD, FAHA, FNCS – Program Director, NCC Fellowship Training at NYP; David Roh, MD – Attending Physician, CUIMC; Faculty, Weill Cornell Medical Center. CVICU is always a thoroughly stimulating learning environment with ample opportunities to learn about mechanical support. Program Director, NCC Fellowship Program, Zachary Threlkeld, MD CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Veronica Santini, M.D., M.A., 954-632-8899, santiniv@stanford.edu. Specialty: Internal Medicine/Cardiology. So far, I have really enjoyed my Stanford MSICU blocks. It's a true multidisciplinary specialty, and the variety of the backgrounds from your colleagues at Stanford really shines through. Having colleagues from these different fields has certainly helps active knowledge sharing, discussions and debates that broadens one's understanding of the science behind our daily clinical practice. Direct patient care in a supervised structured environment ... pediatric neurosurgery, neuro-oncology, neurocritical care and more. 3 Neurocritical Care ICU blocks SUH Total 3 NSICU trained folks. What’s your favorite rotation, and why? What’s your favorite rotation, and why? I love working with post operative cardiac patients. Working with the most forward thinking, distinguished physicians, encouraged me to not only challenge myself to take an active role in evaluating literature, but to also find ways to contribute to a successful research program. I feel motivated every day to see how years of training turn into managing life threatening conditions and making impactful changes on my patients’ health and their families. I deeply value the community and relationships at Stanford and I would strongly recommend the fellowship.". My favorite rotation is the CVICU and MICU experiences. Dates: 7/20 - 6/21 Sylvan Cox (260) I was seeking a program offering complex, critically-ill patients, the full-spectrum of specialty services and a collaborative approach to patient care—all of which Stanford offers. To care for a huge breadth of patients with and learning to master interventions ranging from resuscitation to palliation. Michael Chen (275) The unique fellowship structure—consisting of primarily medical ICU blocks (as a MICU fellow) in the first year, followed by dedicated time and experience in the neuro-ICU in the second year-- exposed me to a breadth of illnesses and diseases, and created a phenomenal learning environment. . I chose Stanford for the integrated nature of its program. Specialty: Internal Medicine/Nephrology. Neurocritical Care Grand Rounds Conferences Toggle Section. The unique combination of interesting/challenging pathology with the chance to form very meaningful relationships with patients and their families is some of their most challenging moments. Specialty: Internal Medicine. Neurocritical care as a recognized and distinct subspecialty of critical care has grown remarkably since its inception in the 1980s. Weather is unbeatable. Annual cell phone allowance ($1,000) I find great satisfaction in performing short procedures to diagnose and treat my patients. I could not imagine a more engaging specialty. MSICU - its the core experience of the fellowship. I like the ownership of a primary service, but enjoy the breadth of pathologies and the collaboration with specialties in the ICU. Bryant Shannon (280) Specialty: Internal Medicine/Cardiology. Specialty: Internal Medicine/Cardiology. Specialty: Emergency Medicine. Why did you choose Stanford? Advanced students with clerkship experience are preferred for the neurocritical care (ICU) site placement. I love the rush working in the ICU, I work begetter under pressure while always expecting the unexpected to happen along with managing challenging cases. As of 2016, there were 61 fellowship training programs accredited by the United Council for Neurologic Subspecialties (UCNS) in the United States and more than 1,000 UCNS-certified neurointensivists from diverse medical backgrounds. Caltrain Go Pass (free rides on commuter train that runs the length of the SF Peninsula) Stanford Anesthesia (#stanesthesia) prioritizes diversity, innovation, housestaff wellness, flexibility, and collaboration. I enjoy dealing with a broad range of clinical problems, and making challenging medical decisions in high acuity situations. Graduates from our two year UCNS certified neurocritical care fellowship have gone on to work in a variety of practice settings and make significant contributions to the field. Working with an amazing team of providers, nurses, and support staff amazing things are possible. We offer a one-year Fellowship program in Clinical Neurophysiology, which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education(ACGME). Class of 2017. Dr. Murray plans to continue as an academic neurological intensivist after fellowship. It is a fun rotation to lead, to teach and to read more about Neurocritical Care! My peers come from cardiology, neurology, nephrology, anesthesia, respirology and more... whenever we hang out, we learn from each other's strengths; this makes us better generalists and stronger ICU specialists. Erum Malik (267) Why Critical Care Medicine? What’s your favorite rotation, and why? I like providing critical care across the spectrum of critically ill patients from the ED to the ICU. Why Critical Care Medicine? Jonathan Weimer (274) It not only involves taking care of medically complex and extremely sick individuals with multi-organ dysfunction, but also provides an opportunity to take a more holistic approach to patient care - from advanced interventions and procedures to respecting patient's wishes/beliefs, end-of-life care, palliation and comfort care. Erica Chimelski (281) But in the ICU, you see those "futile" cases make small improvements and eventually recover their organ function. We look forward to reviewing your application! What’s your favorite rotation, and why? I enjoy procedures, but like to balance that with the more cerebral aspect of managing a complex patient. I chose Stanford because of its world renowned medical institution with some of the best clinicians and researchers in many fields. No step down units. Stanford Medicine tosses original algorithm, allocates more vaccines to front-line residents and fellows Vaccine Distribution Dashboard as of 10 p.m. on Dec. 22 (Photo: Courtesy of Stanford … Dates: 8/20 - 7/22 In addition I find the program structure to be impressive and thoughtfully designed, and I particularly like the focus and support for fellows' tailored goals for their training. All neurocritical care boarded. Learn how we are healing patients through science & compassion, Stanford team stimulates neurons to induce particular perceptions in mice's minds, Students from far and near begin medical studies at Stanford. Why did you choose Stanford? I was given a well-rounded experience to manage the most complex and highest acuity patients in both the medical and neuro intensive care units. What’s your favorite rotation, and why? Friendly residents and fellows, amazing research opportunities, great learning environment and D.C.! Support Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford and child and maternal health, Robert Arrigo (278) Specialty: Internal Medicine/Nephrology. Stanford Critical Care Medicine program is one of its kind in successfully amalgamating trainees from diverse backgrounds - Neurology, Anesthesia, Internal Medicine, Cardiology, Pulmonary / Critical Care and Emergency Medicine. Specialty: Internal Medicine/Infectious Disease. Why did you choose Stanford? The decision to stick around after residency was a no-brainer. In addition, as fellows, we help run clinical trials, currently we are sub-investigators on over 15 national trials. Dates: 8/20 - 7/21 Stanford is particularly well-suited for this pursuit as a high-volume heart failure, mechanical circulatory support, and heart transplant center.. You work with great nurses and residents, taking care of patients with very unique pathology. I completed my anesthesia/internal medicine residency at Stanford and really enjoyed my time here. Dates: 7/20 - 6/21 KPRC = Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, Redwood City Why Critical Care Medicine? Large diverse group of fellows and attendings with different backgrounds to learn from. The support, friendship and learning from both neurology and critical care colleagues of various backgrounds and disciplines further enhanced my learning experience during fellowship. During my time at Stanford, I felt confident in building relationships with my mentors who then supported me as I began my practice. Months rotating in Stanford's cardiac ICU and cardiothoracic surgical ICU have been some of the most exciting and rewarding of my training. Dates: 8/19 - 7/21 Dates: 7/20 - 6/21 Jason Block (263) I enjoy helping patients and their families to navigate through difficult experiences in their lives. Moya-moya), inflammatory (i.e vasculitis), and infectious, Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and vasospasm, Vascular malformations (AVM, cavernous malformations, fistulas,etc), Indications for surgical management of brain ischemia and hemorrhage, Peri-operative care after neurosurgical or interventional neuroradiology procedures, Concurrent critical medical or surgical illness, Complications of vascular disease, including raised intracranial pressure, sepsis and venous thrombosis, Management of extra-ventricular drains and multimodal monitoring, Neurological complications of pre and post organ transplant patients, Three letters of recommendation, including one from your residency program director, If applicable, ECFMG Certificate (transmitted by NBME) *. *  At this time, the Neurocritical Care Fellowship Program can only sponsor fellows on a J-1 clinical visa. I love the teamwork, the physiology, the challenge, the patients and their families. Why Critical Care Medicine? Push Boundaries. I believe Stanford is a unique place where a Neurocritical Care fellow is trained at par with the fellows from other critical care medicine fields. We encourage unique and diverse perspectives which enhance our clinical, research, and education missions. Specialty: Internal Medicine/Anesthesia. Stanford MSICU because of the training opportunities that the rotation has to offer and the outstanding faculty I get to work with. Why Critical Care Medicine? Medical, dental, vision, life, and disability insurance plans are available to fellows. During his medical research thesis in Heidelberg he investigated vivo neuronal physiology in an epilepsy mouse model at the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research. has been one of the best parts of fellowship. It is an amazing place to live and there is plenty of outdoor stuff to do, even in the time of COVID. I love Neurology and have enjoyed talking directly with some of the most innovative people in the field of neurocritical care and stroke. Housing stipend in addition to annual salary ($7,200 per year paid out monthly) The CPMC Neurocritical Care Fellowship program has been UCNS accredited since 2010. Attendance at one national meeting second fellowship year (paid by Division) For more information, please go to: https://med.stanford.edu/gme/diversity.html. ... Stanford. This is a subspecialty where you can have a vast group people from various different backgrounds and it’s always truly fascinating how much you end up learning from each other. Specialty: Emergency Medicine. Many times there are difficult questions to be answered, like what makes their life important, or, unfortunately, sometimes even how they would like to die. Xavier Jimenez Samayoa (266) Fellows have in-house call during their Medical-Surgical-Neuro ICU blocks that is shared with the critical care medicine fellows (Anesthesia, Pulmonary, Emergency Medicine, and Critical Care Medicine). My goal is to become a well-rounded intensivist with an expertise in infectious diseases, and to participate in collaborative research focus on sepsis, hospital-acquired infections, and antimicrobial stewardship. In addition, fellows will rotate in the surgical, medical and cardiac intensive care units where they will receive a well-rounded education of all aspects of critical care. Why Critical Care Medicine? Most institutions have leveraged their neurocritical care fellows as backup for other ICUs throughout the hospital. They are vastly different in terms of patient population, acuity, and structure, but they are both endearing in their own ways. From the very start of my medical training I felt like the most interesting patients of every medical and surgical subspecialty were those critically ill. Since its inception in the year 2001, the Stanford neurocritical care program has provided unparalleled care for patients with critical neurologic illness. Phone Triage—a new challenge amidst the hospital always awaits: whether it be pathology, goals of care, planning for disposition, prioritizing resources, resolving diagnostic dilemmas, providing reassurance, or acute resuscitation. I love working and learning along with competent nurses, respiratory therapists, pharmacists surgeons, and other specialists. Program leadership conducts a holistic review of candidate applications. Having trained in cardiology prior to coming to Stanford, I wanted to get a more in-depth training in the critical care arena in order to better be able to become an attending in a cardiac critical care unit and cardiothoracic surgical ICU. Tiffany Lee (276) Anna Finley Caulfield, MD What’s your favorite rotation, and why? Annual educational bonus ($2,000 with timely completion of administrative training modules) PD controls the flow of what patients he wants to admit. I think there is a robust infrastructure and a highly progressive environment here at Stanford that helps support such a training. We seek highly qualified candidates who would be inquisitive, dedicated fellows. The faculty member will attend in the Neurosciences Intensive Care Unit at Stanford. Why Critical Care Medicine? While at times it is exhausting, it is always fulfilling. Msicu blocks and Inclusion Committee, and why, quality improvement, education innovation and/or! Its acuity, intense human interactions and need to anticipate the next steps is.. Bay Area is a pleasure has been one of the training opportunities that the rotation to... 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